Alumni Profiles: Jeremy Leigh Pemberton (MBA’61)

I read Classics at Eton. I did two years national service in which I had the distinction of guarding HM The Queen and Rudolf Hess, though not, as you might imagine, at the same time. My next step was studying at Oxford. I read law at Magdalen College with a job in prospect in a connected family business which in the event did not materialise.

And then my professional life started. My first job was with Liebig’s Extract of Meat Co. Ltd., the parent company of Oxo, Fray Bentos manufacturers of canned meats, soups etc. for which I worked on the European side. My then boss was about to take himself off to Harvard on a management course when the information about INSEAD fell on his desk; INSEAD was completely unknown at that time in the UK (and elsewhere) which was early 1960.

After some thought I agreed to apply and I only wonder in retrospect why I even hesitated! I was interviewed by Professor Kenneth Most who was to come to Fontainebleau later to give a course in management accounting.

In the 1960s INSEAD required that students could speak and write in three languages: English, French and German. My French was passable in those days, but my German was non-existent so I spent August at the Berlitz school in Paris along with future colleagues working on English, French or German. We all went through a form of language test at the end of the month, but in retrospect I imagine that the school was keen for us to enrol – so we all passed!

After a short time in the Hotel d’Albe I was moved to Avon where I shared a room with Michel Gauthier (who very sadly passed away very recently).

Although companionship was strong among the “participants” it was not an easy time. Accommodation was relatively temporary and led to some complaints, the food at Avon was not always well prepared, but most of all there was a feeling that the “direction” had insufficient experience in the form of teaching, the “case study” method resulting in heavy workloads and inconclusive discussions. For the French contingent, particularly, and naturally by far the largest element, the case study method and the lack of a single conclusion to a discussion was very unsettling. I was among a small number who approached a visiting Swiss Professor Silberer to ask for his help in trying to resolve what was becoming a crisis; we then went to talk to Olivier Giscard d’Estaing the Directeur General. I am afraid I cannot remember exactly how things were resolved, but after a difficult period Olivier and I became good friends and everything settled down. In line with a tradition in French colleges we performed a musical at the end of the year and as Olivier was known informally as “Gigi” many of the songs came from that musical with words based on life at INSEAD.

“Thank Heavens for INSEAD in Europe, which was quite at sixes (Common Market) and sevens (EFTA) it now has become a sort of Seventh Heaven….” etc., etc.

Michel and I opted for the Study Tour which was based on Italy and Southern Europe. During this tour Michel fell in love with a young German lady interpreter, Renate, whom he married!

Our finale was a party on boats on the Seine and before we all bade each other farewell the French contingent led the way with a local organisation, again largely through the initiative of Michel, and gradually a crop of Alumni Associations came into being.

When I returned to my job in the food industry in London I was put on a training course which included selling, sales management and finally product management. I became product manager of OXO with a substantial annual promotional budget of over £1m – probably the largest single budget in the UK grocery trade at that time. All went well until the company was taken over by Brooke Bond whose principal products were tea and coffee. After a period as Group Marketing Controller where, ably supported by three brand managers, we designed and monitored the marketing plans of all the Group companies worldwide. Brooke Bond then decided to dismantle the central marketing department to everyone’s surprise, within and without the company, and I was once again looking for a job.

Despite help from headhunters and advisers my next job came through a personal contact who, impressed by my graduation from INSEAD, asked me to do a consultancy job for them at a highly specialist paper Mill in Maidstone in Kent.

Happily the combination of INSEAD and my experience in Liebig’s / Brooke Bond armed me with exactly the ingredients needed to solve the problem. In the Paper Industry in the UK in those days you either made paper or you sold it! In this case the separation led to underpricing and lack of profitability. All this came right and the resulting company, Whatman Plc, found itself in the top ten performers on the UK Stock Exchange during the Thatcher Years.

During this time and when the company had become highly successful, I became involved in a number of local activities, not least because Whatman was a major employer in the area and neighbours of the Kent County Council.

The CBI, Confederation of British Industry, started a local area organisation in the county (Kent) and I was asked to lead it as founder chairman. This led to a number of involvements with the CBI and one was the response to invitations from schools to talk about Industry and its role in society. From this sprang The Understanding Industry Trust, for whom I spoke in schools for the next few years, also becoming a trustee.

Meanwhile I was asked by INSEAD to spend a week a year as a visiting professor of marketing and I conducted a case called “Chipmunk Crisps” based on the development and launch of one of Brooke Bond Liebig’s products greatly helped and supported by J Walter Thompson from whom I have to thank for a large proportion of my knowledge of marketing. It was most interesting that, when I visited INSEAD, the participants were generally very confused about marketing – as opposed to selling – so I had quite a willing audience!

I then began to be asked to join other boards as a non-executive director, including two Investment Trusts of which I eventually became chairman. I am still the chairman of the trustees of the D’Oyly Carte Charitable Trust.

Looking back over this time I am grateful that it was so rewarding. As the second President of the International Alumni Association my name is numbered among those interred in the foundations of the new Campus. Following the work that I did for such as the CBI and as Kent’s first Chairman of Business Link, I was very privileged to be invited to Buckingham Palace to receive the Companionship of the British Empire from the Queen and later invited to become one of his deputies by the then Lord Lieutenant of Kent.

I have very close friends from my promotion. Together we are passionate about our time at INSEAD, our careers and the deep friendships we made. Our adventure in Fontainebleau feels special because of the pioneering nature of our time at INSEAD. We recently met at Verbier to benefit from the Verbier Festival. And we are looking forward to our next meeting somewhere around the world.

If you are interested in sharing your alumni story, please contact the UK alumni association at uk.manager@insead.edu

June 2019

Alumni Profiles: Azadeh Ghotbi (MBA’94)

How I found I needed to always wear two hats to find the right balance

I can hardly believe I’m about to attend my 25th year INSEAD reunion this year. Has it been that long already? I so look forward to going back to Fontainebleau and spending time reminiscing about the past and catching up with former classmates many of whom I consider good friends. Love hearing about the journey people took, where they thought they’d be, where they landed, and what they’ve learnt from it all.

My own story is somewhat unusual especially for an INSEAD alumna. I left Iran at the cusp of the revolution, lived between France and the US, got my French baccalauréat, studied international relations at BROWN University and took a job in telecommunication consulting.  So far so ‘normal’ except that I very soon realized I had just taken a wrong turn.  I wanted a more creative job so I applied to INSEAD hoping that an MBA would jumpstart a more interesting career in international marketing. INSEAD was everything I like: Multiculti, open to the world, friendly, dynamic and stimulating. From there, I joined L’Oréal and sailed the ship I thought was meant for me. Other jobs followed. The most exciting and challenging one was being given near carte blanche to create a website and ecommerce division from scratch for an American cosmetics retailer back in 2000.

What I haven’t told you yet is that I took one art history class in college and felt an irresistible compulsion to paint. First time since kindergarten! I come from a rather cartesian academically focused family, so I took the urge to produce abstract paintings of all things as an odd hiccup at best! I discarded the couple works I painted and moved on with my life. Some years later, getting a French work permit proved harder than planned and I had a few spare months before being allowed to start my first post MBA job. Lo and behold that repressed urge immediately crept back and I started painting again. I continued on and off throughout my corporate life but didn’t talk much about it as I couldn’t quite rationalize my own behaviour. Fast forward many years and a chance encounter with a private art dealer led me to donate two works to the Asia Society of New York where a Christie’s auctioneer sold them during a charity gala. Standing in the back of a room filled with strangers bidding for my paintings was the most surreal yet thrilling experience. Yet it took another decade for me to feel half comfortable referring to myself as an “artist”. Towards the last years I was the VP of a cosmetics company by day (crazy long New York workdays!) and a painter whenever else possible. Not quite sure how I pulled off that double life.

I ended up leaving the corporate world behind around a decade ago to focus on my art. Cutting off the structure, comfort and safety of it all was exciting yet quite daunting. The journey was long and lonely though gratifying in ways I hadn’t experienced before. I finally had time to fill my days not with endless meetings but rather studio time, art fairs, gallery and museum shows around the world. I also added photography to my body of work. My last exhibit, The Nature of Light, which took place in London earlier this year examined the alchemy and interplay between light, time, movement and space with a focus on impermanence and perception. The exhibit moves to Paris in early June.

While I am passionate about the artworld part of my left brain did start feeling somewhat underwhelmed some years ago. I decided to get into the property search business and thus resume wearing two hats this time juggling art with real estate, the asset class I’ve always felt most attracted to. I once again get to leverage some of the skillsets acquired at INSEAD making net yield analysis and price comparison charts to help clients find the best investment property or optimally priced home. The part I enjoy most is the hunt for the right property, looking for unique features, good design or renovation opportunities, and sound value. Since I work for myself, I have the ultimate privilege of balancing my time and energy between art and property search. My left and right brain couldn’t be happier. Finally!

If you are interested in sharing your alumni story, please contact the UK alumni association at uk.manager@insead.edu

May 2019

Alumni Profiles: Graham Gould (MBA’85J)

Life is about taking opportunities when they present themselves

I graduated from INSEAD nearly thirty-four years ago. This is simply incredible to me. If someone had asked me when I left university (forty-years ago!) how my working life would pan out, there is no part of it I would have guessed.

My first job was selling suits to American soldiers stationed in West Germany. I had never been to Germany, didn’t speak a word of German and didn’t have much sales experience. In fact, doing new things and going in different directions has turned out to be a characteristic of my working life.  I only applied to INSEAD because I met someone whilst I was in Germany who told me about it.

I have never discovered my “true vocation” and I think for many people this holy grail doesn’t exist. When I left INSEAD a class mate who had worked at Bain said that he was going to join a former Bain colleague who was starting his own management consultancy. I ended up joining this consultancy as the first employee. My class mate (still one of my closest friends) went to work for Merrill Lynch instead. The consultancy was successful and after twelve years we sold the business to an American consultancy.

A couple of years before we sold the business a personal tragedy occurred – our five year old son died. I was thirty-eight years old. The trauma of this made me reevaluate what was really important. It made me realise that whilst work is important its importance to me is of a lower order to me compared with family, friends and health. This realisation strongly influenced the career choices that I subsequently made and I regard myself as very fortunate, firstly that I was able to learn this lesson at a young enough age for it to make a difference and secondly that we sold the business which had given me some financial security.

After we sold the business I had five years pursuing a portfolio of interests which was a period I really loved. One of the interests was seeing if I could be successful in starting a new business which was in property. Through this I was approached by a wealth manager and asked if I would create a property fund management business is partnership with them. I decided to do this as I felt I would regret it if I didn’t. It meant giving up the rest of my portfolio of interests. We went on to build a portfolio of assets worth c. £200m.  After eight years the wealth manager was sold by its parent to a private equity business. I found myself in partnership with people I really did not enjoy working with. After about a year I decided life was too short and resigned from the partnership.

I am now Chairman of Thermal Recycling, a new business. We believe it is the first company in the world to have found a commercially viable approach to treating asbestos. Currently nearly all asbestos is buried in landfill sites which simply pushes the problem on to future generations. Our treatment means that this no longer needs to happen. The treated product can be reused as a construction material. It is great to be leading a business that can help to change the world in a positive way and to be part of INSEAD’s force for good.

My other role is as a partner, and founder, of LGEC Capital Partners. We are four partners with different but complimentary backgrounds – strategy, law, accountancy and technology. We have known each other for many years and set up the business to use our collective experience to help growing businesses. Only the partners do the work. We look to have long term relationships with a small number of companies that we work with where we can help them to grow using our combined experience and expertise.

INSEAD was one of the best decisions that I ever made. It was one of the most enjoyable years I ever had, it gave me confidence that I could try anything, it changed the way other people saw me and most of my closest friends today are people I met at INSEAD.

What have I learned since INSEAD? You need some luck and you need to take opportunities that present themselves. You need to work out what is important to you, what you enjoy and what you are good at. You need to be resilient. You must never compare yourself to other people and you must work out what “enough” means to you. If you have “enough” or have had enough it is time to move on and do something different as having more than “enough” isn’t a good use of time.

April 2019

Alumni Profiles: Letícia Bevilaqua (MBA’12J)

‘Doing good’ in a lot of wonderful ways

Ever since I graduated from electrical engineering in Brazil, I used to say: “I’m going to do an MBA so I can gain some business skills that I didn’t get from an engineering degree”. When seven years later one friend asked me: “So, when are you actually going to do this MBA thing of yours?” I could finally then tell him: “I’m applying to INSEAD now!” The timing for me was important because I needed a permanent resident status for the UK before moving away, so that I could come back without visa requirements out. London has been what I call home since 2006 when after six months internship in Zurich I decided I wanted to move to Europe after graduating (although I did have a stop over the US for 18 months before moving to London).

When I applied to INSEAD, I was very clear on my career and personal goals. I only applied to INSEAD after having visited IESE, LBS and IE. I knew INSEAD had the right profile of experienced, international and diverse students. After my MBA, I wanted to work with renewable energy in London, where I had left my partner behind. Back then I thought I was sick and tired of working with technology, which had been my career path since I graduated. Thanks to INSEAD’s network, I actually did get a job with renewable energy and my manager was an alum as well. My first female manager and one of the best ones I’ve had in my career.

Fast forward and after two and a half years working in renewable energy, I realised that technology was, actually, my gig of choice. Having worked in technology for eight years prior to INSEAD, I realised I actually liked its speed! Being able to see changes every six months with the technological landscape meant more to me than working on a 10-year project for an offshore wind farm. Now I know I will likely stay with technology for the rest of my career. I’ve learnt it takes perspective to separate why and what you love about what you do. I wanted to work in renewable energy because I wanted to work on something I was proud of and was “doing good for the world”. I now work on something that I’ve never felt prouder and more connected to that mission and values.

It’s interesting to see how, when I worked in renewables, the thought of “doing good” and having a positive impact in the world, actually never came up and quickly became a distant idealistic view of that career path to me. No one would ever think about the change an offshore wind farm would have to the world or environment. Whereas now, I work in technology helping millions of employees to feel more connected to their work, values and colleagues and I feel that connection every single day. From the messages from my clients to the stories I hear from other colleagues I feel the impact of “doing good” on a weekly basis.

So, when my plans change, it’s not as daunting, as it may have been before. I have somehow a clear goal. And being connected to some of my core values is so important for me. INSEAD let me jump into my dream job, brought me into a city I love and connected me to wonderful friends.

If you are interested in sharing your alumni story, please contact the UK alumni association at uk.manager@insead.edu

March 2019

Alumni Profiles: Ruslan Shopov (MBA’14D)

Real estate in London became REAL

I was born and grew up in Bulgaria’s second largest city Plovdiv, which is considered to be the oldest continually-inhabited city in Europe and one of the oldest in the world. This year Plovdiv is also the European Capital of Culture. I embarked on my international experience by enrolling at the American University in Bulgaria, which is a typical American-style liberal arts college. The school created well-rounded individuals, who had a wide range of courses. Afterwards students focused on a specific major. While studying there, I had my first international exposure, as not only the professors, but also many of the students were foreigners, including American exchange students. I already knew that I wanted to do and MBA, but I needed some experience beforehand.

Hence, after graduation, my intention was to spend a few years in the corporate world and gain some business experience. I started my first job as an investment consultant in the local Sofia office of Cushman & Wakefield (one of the global commercial real estate advisory companies). At that time (2008), Bulgaria had just joined the European Union and the economy was booming alongside expectations for convergence with Western Europe. Real estate and commercial real estate in particular was one of the main beneficiaries of the economic boom with lots of foreign investors. Commercial real estate was particularly attractive to me as this sector was just emerging in Bulgaria. I had the chance to have a real impact early in my career as the company and sector were new at the time and the environment was more entrepreneurial. I spent almost six years working there advising shopping mall, office, logistics and hospitality projects, preparing valuations and feasibility studies. I saw how this sector emerged in Bulgaria and coped with the aftermath of the global financial crisis.

Time flew by fast as I was also studying for the CFA exams and after completing the three levels I realised that it was about time to think about finally applying for an MBA. An MBA that would grow my experience and exposure to students from many different countries, jobs and cultures. I did a pretty comprehensive research of the top business schools and the more I was researching, the more I was realising that INSEAD was my dream school and top choice. It is Europe’s first business school with an established global network, prestigious reputation, but at the same time with friendlier and more collaborative culture than many of its top business schools peers. Needless to say, its unique double campus structure in Fontainebleau near Paris and Singapore was a huge plus for me combining the classic European experience, the exotic and at the same time futuristic Singaporean experience and a lot more. As it was my dream school, I applied only to INSEAD and was fortunate enough to be accepted. I started my INSEAD year in Singapore and then moved to Fontainebleau. Overall, it was definitely the best year of my life so far where I met new friends from all over the world, took interesting classes with some of the best professors and had the chance to explore Southeast Asia. It’s not without a reason that INSEAD is famous for being the “party business school”. I have fond memories of the welcome week, the first party on Sentosa Island, the parties in Heritage and Dover, drinks at Ku De Ta (Marina Bay Sands) and One Altitude bars and the numerous house parties in Fonty. I definitely enjoyed the most when I travelled to Langkawi Island (Malaysia), Angkor Wat temples (Cambodia) and Halong Bay (Vietnam). I also really enjoyed my elective course in Russia, where we visited both Moscow and Saint Petersburg. There we even had the luck of having a tour guide, who showed us the incredibly beautiful palaces of Peterhof, Catherine Palace and the Winter Palace.

My post-INSEAD goal was to move to London and transition from the advisory to the investment side of real estate. Apart from the job opportunities which London offers, it’s definitely the most international city in the world with amazing variety of things to do. I already had friends and classmates from INSEAD, university and high school based in London and this was one of the main reasons which attracted me to the city. I achieved this objective by joining the real estate investment team at the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) at its headquarters in London. The EBRD is a development bank which was established after the fall of communism to help Central and Eastern Europe transition to a well-functioning private market economy and invests in both debt and equity instruments. Since joining the EBRD, I have participated in a number of very interesting real estate investment deals and I am currently leading a few challenging and innovative transactions. Outside work, I try to get the most London has to offer in terms of going out to bars and restaurants, attending events and exhibitions as well as visiting London’s great parks. Since graduation, I was invited to join the leadership committee of INSEAD Alumni Association UK’s Real Estate Group managed to organise and participate in several events already.

The year spent at INSEAD really transformed my life as it helped me build new friendships, expand my network, move to London and find an interesting and challenging job.

If you are interested in sharing your alumni story, please contact the UK alumni association at uk.manager@insead.edu

2019

Alumni Profiles: Lisa Long (MBA’06J)

Startups and Zombies

Things turned out much better than I could have imagined. I was supposed to follow in the footsteps of my family – leave university, get an advanced degree, and then enter a nice stable job with a large company. Or… I could spend spring break sleeping on the floor of my sister’s girlfriend’s flat in San Francisco, crash a job fair at Stanford, and get a job as a coder even though I was actually a chemical engineer and thought Java was an island.

I fell in love with the startup world and made it through the entire Silicon Valley checklist: from the company milestones of going public (or more commonly, going bust…) to the personal millstones of sleeping under my desk and getting fired. I joined in a company’s European expansion and started thinking about learning the business side of startups.

I went to visit a friend at INSEAD and had such fun this seemed like the right move. I took the daring move of applying just to INSEAD and was ecstatic when I got in. Arriving in Fonty was another story… I felt that I had made a terrible mistake for the first four months and regularly considered dropping out entirely. I felt I didn’t fit in with the well-dressed consultants and bankers that made up the majority of my class. By P3, a lucky housing switch and move to Singapore meant I was able to ‘find my people’ and I still enjoy the company of those friends on a regular basis though we’re spread across the globe.

Despite graduating into the opportunity of the pre-financial crisis market in 2006, I decided against a job and wanted to start my own company. Reality caught up with me three months later when I realised I couldn’t earn enough to pay off my business school loans, so I went into someone else’s startup company.

Almost a year later, timing worked out better and I co-founded a new games company in London – Six to Start. Mind, I was still working a day job to be able to pay those business school loans, but I had co-founders, who were able to take the company forward until a point when we had enough money that I could join full-time. The INSEAD alumni network was particularly crucial in solving problems like finding people in Moscow, Dubai and Tokyo to hold a copy of the book The Great Game for the band Muse’s worldwide treasure hunt. My classmates were mostly understanding about receiving very strange requests from me on a regular basis!

After a time, I pulled back from the day to day Six to Start operations, remaining on the board, and went to work with a few other startup companies. Not of all of them survived, but I learned a great deal from raising money in Silicon Valley to the vagaries of 3D mobile software development. Six to Start carried on and found success with the creation of Zombies, Run!, the world’s most popular fitness game. If nothing else, I feel confident saying that of all my INSEAD entrepreneur classmates, I win for having generated the most fun for other people as part of my startup journey.

My interest in starting new things hasn’t ended (or maybe I just haven’t learned…). I’m now exploring a new idea with helping people make better startup companies. The new company has co-founders in Oslo, Norway and Singapore, so it’s getting a proper INSEAD international start. We’re still in the research phase on the problem, but you can keep track of what we’re up to on Twitter by following @beforeyoucode. To all my classmates, consider this a heads up that many more weird requests are on their way to our class mailing list!

If you are interested in sharing your alumni story, please contact the UK alumni association at uk.manager@insead.edu

December 2018

Alumni Profiles: Jim Strang (AMP’17Jul)

Keep going and keep growing…

So, as my father once said to me, “Son, if you ever write an autobiography you should call it -The Path of Most Resistance.” My personal journey to INSEAD was not a particularly obvious one. For one thing, I enrolled when I was 46, which happens to be the same age Jack Nicklaus was when he won his last major, for another my INSEAD time was spent on the AMP Programme, not the MBA.

My career started off in Edinburgh, the “Athens of the North”, but without the associated climate. I graduated from Edinburgh University with a surprisingly good degree and an emerging interest in the world of Finance. Now Edinburgh is / was not a bad place to foster that interest given the plethora of large investment houses based there. I think back then Standard Life owned 2 or 3% of the UK Stock market. My own uniquely mad path actually saw me combine working for one the aforementioned august institutions with doing a Ph.D. in…Finance. Four more or less happy years followed juggling three things at once (including a year “off” in Cambridge picking up a Masters degree from what is now called the Judge Business School) before I officially “retired” from academia and moved to London for challenges new.

For me that meant the world of consulting and Bain and Company. An amazing place is Bain. I’d say most of the really clever stuff I learnt in my career I learnt there. I also met my wife, who sadly chose to graduate from Europe’s #2 business school based not too far from where I am sitting now. Bain led me to Private Equity, like many of my peers, and I now run the EMEA operations from a group called Hamilton Lane here in London. There’s never a dull moment.

My INSEAD story begins a couple of years ago as I was doing some reflection on where I was at professionally and where I might like to go. I had a definite sense of “what got you here won’t get you there…” which led to a number of conversations around my own development needs, notably with an old friend from Bain and an INSEAD alum whose professional world this is. Enter the AMP. For those who are unaware this is a month long programme for “senior” leaders that’s designed to help you focus on leading yourself and your organization in the increasingly volatile and disruptive world in which we live. It also focusses a lot on the “you”. Professor Ian Woodward who, frankly, is a genius leads the programme. I joined a cohort (the #110th) of 80 other like-minded folk from around the world and off we merrily went on our personal journeys.

I have to say it was pretty much the best thing I have done. It is a totally different experience and, for many it is a pretty cathartic one. It was a special experience to spend the time with such a diverse and talented group, getting to the answers on the challenges we all faced. Interestingly, as a group, we could not have been more eclectic but our issues were all remarkably similar.
Coming out of “the bubble” our group returned to respective homes very humbled by what we had had the opportunity to learn on the programme from the Faculty and from each other. I am happy to say the group of us manages to stay very connected (thank you What’s App) and so the bonds that we made in summertime in Fontainebleau seem set to last for a very long time.

I know for my part that month in the sun has definitely made me a better and more effective leader, helped me understand what getting to “there” really is for me personally and given me the tools and perspectives to have a decent go at it. I also know that I’ll never conduct an orchestra! (…if you want the whole story here, drop me a note! Sorry Ian…). The fact that I now have a wonderful bunch of crazy, wonderful, talented fellow INSEAD classmates to call on is just a huge bonus and something I feel pretty humbled by.

If you are interested in sharing your alumni story, please contact the UK alumni association at uk.manager@insead.edu

October 2018

Alumni Profiles: Kate Ellis (MBA’91D)

Business as a force for good

INSEAD opens up choices and I chose variety: in the 27 years since I left Fontainebleau my career has taken me to many different workplaces, including car assembly lines, oil tankers, trading floors, prisons (though never overnight…) and now some of the world’s largest nuclear installations. Always surrounded by smart, dedicated professionals, I have loved testing out what the commercial profession can bring to the table: how can we help to provide the goods and services that people need, or help solve some of society’s most intractable challenges?

An engineer by profession, industry appealed to me because I liked the idea of many diverse people coming together to make something which other people wanted – that neat cycle that keeps so many of us entwined as creators and consumers. I started my working life running an assembly line at Jaguar Cars – I was determined to learn what it was really like at the sharp end of manufacturing. After three and a half mind broadening years at Jaguar I decided that an MBA would be a great way of building a wider understanding of the business world, essential if I was to progress. I also hoped that it would give me some of the confidence which all senior people (i.e. men) seemed to have – this was very much the era of the glass ceiling and female role models were nowhere to be seen in my working world.

Having grown up in a multinational household, INSEAD was the obvious choice and it turned out to be everything I had hoped for and more. Yes, you certainly grew your skills in marketing, accounting, corporate finance and so on, but you also learnt how to lead in unfamiliar situations, how to engage diverse groups and you realised that what you had to offer really did have value even among very smart people! Best of all, the diversity of backgrounds of my fellow students opened my eyes to the range of opportunities to be explored.

Of course, choice means making decisions and I have been fortunate in always being able to work for organisations whose values I felt passionate about and whose mission I believed in wholeheartedly. They have also supported my desire to be active in the not for profit sector – I am on the Boards of a theatre, a large local charity and a UK business school (not a serious competitor of INSEAD’s yet, but one day…). The learning here has worked both ways – while I bring commercial and corporate experience and expertise to these Boards, my not for profit work has broadened my ideas and, I believe, made me a better leader.

From INSEAD I joined BP where I spend 22 very interesting years in jobs as varied as running a chemicals business, negotiating the commercial contracts underpinning the construction and operation of an international gas pipeline and leading the internal Group engagement around the launch of BP’s new Helios brand. And finally having the Commercial Director role in BP Shipping, which introduced me to a fascinating world of complex, high risk operations combined with a proud history and deep sense of tradition.

Family ties then called and I took a year’s sabbatical in order to be with my parents, which was a special time I will never forget. However, once I came to consider ‘what next?’ The ideal opportunity came up when I saw that the UK Civil Service was looking for Commercial Directors.

The commercial teams in each Government Department negotiate and manage the UK Government’s contracts – each year it spends almost £50 bn on goods and services. The idea is to harness the creativity, resources and expertise of the private and not for profit sectors in order to address some of the most difficult challenges in society. As a Commercial Director I sometimes feel like an interpreter between two very different cultures and it draws on every ounce of my previous experience and expertise.

After two years as Commercial Director at the Ministry of Justice, a year ago I moved to become the Commercial Director of the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority. In each instance I have had the privilege of learning from experts about how we are trying to solve complex social challenges – from the criminal justice system seeking to reduce reoffending to the nuclear sector dealing with the legacy of nuclear infrastructure. If we are successful, we achieve the ideal cycle of society benefitting from innovative solutions, provided by thriving businesses, generating good jobs…all the while providing good value to the taxpayer. I believe that I may be planting the INSEAD flag in new territory….

If you are interested in sharing your alumni story, please contact the UK alumni association at uk.manager@insead.edu

October 2018

Alumni Profiles: Charles MacKinnon (MBA’85J)

The journey from Fontainebleau

I hated my first job, and doing an MBA seemed to be a fun way of restarting my career, but I truly had no idea as to how wide ranging and far reaching that re-start would be, nor how durable the impact would be over time.

After leaving INSEAD I, fairly conventionally, went to work for Goldman Sachs in London. What was unusual was that I was able to last there for 15 years, and did not become a partner, which in truth was a blessing. The blessing was that I retained a life, and a family, and having not become a gad zillionaire, a sense of reality. This reality control eventually took over, and in spring of 2000 I left Goldman and enrolled as a student of Garden Design in London. It was tough being an old student, but wonderful to be able to watch the Tech bubble burst from the side-lines. I also became a fellow of my college at Oxford.

The next bit is where INSEAD and the MBA come to the fore. Following my course, I became a part owner of a garden design and landscaping company. Suddenly I had to do the books, understand HR, plan projects, and have a creative vision. The real world was very different to the text books we had used, and also different from Goldman. People don’t do what they say they will do. People don’t pay on time. People don’t show up. People don’t care about my “Vision”.  It didn’t work out; I wasn’t a very good designer, and my business partner wasn’t very good at business, so I left, and was back on the street (significantly poorer) looking for work.

Luckily, work came looking for me, and with my next door neighbour we set up an investment management company called Thurleigh. Everything we did was textbook INSEAD. Process, vision, targets, KPI and so forth. The Key was that we wanted to do it right, again a message from endless cases on successful companies. Luckily it worked out, and as we both approached and passed our 60th birthdays, we sold the company.

Its now, my current reality, that the true value of INSEAD comes out. I’m an employee of the company that bought the company that bought my company, and am a living witness to the truth that growth by acquisition is a difficult strategy. Value is destroyed in a time honoured manner; nobody takes responsibility for their actions, there are fiefdoms, fudges and power struggles. While our core product is good, and most people are trying to do the right thing for the clients, the institution has got to re-find its client focus out of the detritus of implementation and integration.

The balance to this is that I am deeply involved in a number of start-ups in Fintech, Art, Green Energy, which once again is right back to the INSEAD basics; the gift that keeps on giving.

Morals of the story are quite banal; be good to people on your way up, as you will need them on the way down. Always strive to do what is right, even if it feels like economic suicide, and overwhelmingly keep an open and flexible mind and don’t let your work define you.

If you are interested in sharing your alumni story, please contact the UK alumni association at uk.manager@insead.edu

August 2018

Alumni Profiles: Daniela Mordetzki (MBA’17D)

The six months since graduating from INSEAD have passed by in no time, and I’m still a bit surprised to call myself an alumna. With the whirlwind of the experience still close, I’m just starting to define this new chapter, finding my feet in a new role and exploring what it means to be part of the alumni community.

My background is not uncommon for INSEAD – I grew up in Uruguay and the United States, and moved to Israel at the age of nineteen to study industrial engineering. Ever since, I’ve lived with the familiar INSEAD feeling of not knowing where home is, and a deep sense of curiosity about other cultures. After nine years, I felt ready to push my limits again, and finally made my way to Fontainebleau with my husband and our cat – both of whom turned out to be fantastic MBA partners.

Since graduating last December, I took some time off to get settled in London before joining The Boston Consulting Group. We chose London post-INSEAD for a mix of professional and personal reasons, and feel incredibly lucky to be here. While flat hunting for a pet-friendly apartment was truly a delight, this felt like home from the very first days. From a career perspective, I loved that London offices were highly diverse and offered projects in multiple industries. But more than that, I’ve felt that I can be my own multicultural self here, without having to earn the right to belong – no one seems to mind where I’m from. With family close by and career opportunities for my husband, London ticked all the boxes, but has delivered much more. And after years of living under relentless sunshine year-round, yes, I really can’t get enough of rainy Sunday afternoons with a cup of tea…

The learning curve at BCG so far has been exhilarating, in many ways matching the pace and depth of reflection that I experienced at INSEAD. I’m currently working on a case that will make a very tangible impact on people’s lives, and have been surrounded by exceptionally supportive colleagues and mentors. It’s been a pleasure to begin my journey together with some familiar faces from INSEAD, and to meet alumni doing incredible work at BCG. I can see truly exciting opportunities ahead, and feel fortunate to be working with frighteningly intelligent people, advising clients on the problems that matter most to them.

Looking back, the decision to go to INSEAD was triggered by the same pursuit of discovery. I was eager to expand my horizons, and felt that INSEAD’s multicultural environment was the best fit for me. From a career perspective, I was looking for a change in location and scope, aiming to transition into strategy consulting at a global level. I also very much wanted the experience – the opportunity to stop time and explore, make strong friendships, and find connections in unexpected places.
My time at INSEAD delivered all of the above, and ended with the immense honor of being Valedictorian of my class at our Graduation Ceremony in Singapore. I was elected by my peers, and overcome by the outpour of support and encouragement from people I deeply respect. The memories and emotions of this day are still fresh, and my wish for my classmates is as strong as ever – that INSEAD not be the single best year of our lives, but just the first of many.

It’s early days yet, and time will tell where the journey will take me. In the coming months, I’m focusing on growing at BCG, exploring London and giving back by supporting INSEAD recruiting in the fall. I look forward to becoming active in the alumni community, and hope to meet you all soon. To the Class of July 2018 – welcome to the other side!

 

If you are interested in sharing your alumni story, please contact the UK alumni association at uk.manager@insead.edu

 

July 2018